CAMP Community Events & Collaborations

Community gathering hosted by SOMCAN in collaboration with CAMP, September 15, 2015

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COMMUNITY CELEBRATIONS & COLLABORATIONS

Clarion Alley Mural Project regularly hosts community events to celebrate new CAMP murals by artists who share CAMP’s vision for social and economic justice. These works are often created in conjunction with community-based organizations partnering with CAMP to provide a voice for those who are disenfranchised. CAMP also collaborates with community organizations to host events and performances.

 

Celebrations and events over the past year have included:

Lit Crawl San Francisco
Saturday, October 15, 2016
Noisebridge, 2169 Mission Street, SF, CA
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Home: Narratives of Place & Displacement
Clarion Alley Mural Project artists and writers reflect on their experiences of place and displacement, including being evicted, living on the streets, and exile.

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Huge THANK YOUS to Amanda Coggin and James Warner of Lit Quake / Lit Crawl and Noisebridge for hosting!!

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Introduction by Amanda Coggin, Lit Quake

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Megan Wilson, Clarion Alley Mural Project

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Shaghayegh Cyrous

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Raymond Castillo, SOMCAN
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Anti-Eviction Mapping Project: Erin McElroy, Patricia Kerman, Ben Marcel Santiago

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Ed Bowers
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MURAL UNVEILING with WRAP (Western Regional Advocacy Project), Hospitality House, and SF Print Collective
July 22, 2016


The Brass Liberation Orchestra (BLO)

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Ivan Vera from Hospitality House’s Community Arts Program

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Paul Boden from Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP)

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Joe Wilson from Central City Hospitality House Community Arts Program 

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Artist Art Hazelwood

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Dance Brigade performing an excerpt from Hemorrhage as a part of ODC Theater’s Walking Distance Dance Festival, June 4, 2016:

ODC’s 2016 Walking Distance Dance Festival explored the meaning of “place” and how it creates and shapes who we are, how we live, and what we create. Clarion Alley Mural Project provided Dance Brigade with the space for their performance Hemorrhage. Written and directed by Krissy Keefer, the work captures the current crisis of world affairs by focusing on the connection between gentrification, global warming, racism and the continued attack on the rights of women. The all-female cast uses explosive text, drumming, dance and theater to examine the dismantling of the Mission District through forced displacement.

“Drawing on the analysis of Rebecca Solnit, Guillermo Gómez-Peña and those who have been recently evicted, Keefer explores the efforts to transform San Francisco into a bedroom community 2 for Silicon Valley, an action that has a farther reach than just the real estate involved. What does this mean for San Francisco, she asks, a city that has long been a beacon for discourse and action around social and environmental justice and global solidarity movements? And what does this mean for the world?

Dance Brigade is known for the way it uses modern dance, storytelling, and Taiko drumming to create a compelling narrative. Honed over the company’s 37-year history, the all-female cast uses strong theatrics, humor and compelling original text to explore today’s political and social situation, while also employing contemporary dance forms such as hip hop, house and Reggaeton.”

Hemorrhage was performed in collaboration with CAMP’s oldest mural by Chuy Campusano, painted in 1994. Dance Brigade performers for the Walking Distance Dance Festival 2016 included: Sarah Bush, Richelle Donigan, Karen Elliot, Lena Gatchalian, Fredrika Keefer, and Kim Valmore.

Check out ODC Writer In Residence Marie Tollon’s conversation with CAMP organizer Megan Wilson on Triple Dog Dare HERE.

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Press Conference Hosted by the Coalition On Homelessness:

San Francisco Campers and Neighbors Speak Out About Luis Gongora Murder and Continued Sweeps of Encampments, April 2016

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When: Thursday, April 21st at 2:00pm
Where: Clarion Alley “Housing is a Human Right” mural- one third of the way down The Alley from the Valencia side.

Mural painted by Megan Wilson & Christopher Statton as part of the Clarion Alley Mural Project.

San Francisco, CA- A shooting by police officers of Luis Gongora, a Mayan Speaking man and father of three children from the Yucatan last Thursday, April 7th was met with a response from both Supervisor Wiener and Mayor Lee calling for homeless sweeps city wide. The Coalition on Homeless, with Supervisor John Avalos as our champion, is calling for a humane response to encampments that truly solves the issue. Earlier this year, a recent widely publicized removal of an encampment containing approximately 300 people along Division Street received broad media attention as the City only provided temporary lodging for about half the residents. The Coalition on Homelessness is concerned that the relocation efforts of homeless people from encampments on Division Street and more recently on Shotwell Street in the city have only further de-stabilized the homeless community, have simply pushed homeless people, in most cases, a very short distance away, and in the worst case scenario have resulted in police-involved murders of homeless individuals such as Luis Gongora last week.

“Homeless and street-based San Franciscans have been surviving these on-going sweeps for months, and in some cases years,” said Bilal Ali, Human Rights Organizer of the SF Coalition on Homelessness. “Instead of actually addressing the issue, the city is continuing this failed policy of displacement rather than listening to us every single time we state the logical solution to the growing crisis which is: HOUSING. Luis Gongora would not have been murdered had he been inside. Bottom-line.”

Homeless people suffer from sleep deprivation, absent a right to rest, they are woken frequently by police and security. Their voices have been nearly eliminated from the discussions currently before San Francisco elected officials today. We invite press and media makers to listen to the voices of and ask questions directly to those who have been surviving the sweeps, witnessesing the violence, and have sustainable, logical solutions to share.